Bikernet Blog Search Bikernet
Ride Forever - Bikernet.com
Thursday Edition


Bikernet Installs Samson Legend Series Hellraisers Exhaust

They will fit any Softail from 1986 to 2012

By Bandit and Tobey, with photos by Wrench
7/24/2012


Share this story:



Hellraisers on a Road King.
Hellraisers on a Road King.



This is a sweet install. It’s cut-and-dried as a popcorn fart. I spoke to a buddy of mine this morning. He struggled with a handlebar install for over a month; too many complications. This install takes no more than a couple of hours. It’s straightforward and requires no machining, welding, and just one helpful special tool, maybe two, but they’re easy ones. We will point out the areas requiring careful thought to simplify the process.
Let’s hit it:

Tools Required:

½-inch combination wrench, open and box ends
5/16-inch combination wrench
9/16-inch combination wrench
3/8 ratchet, with 6-inch extension and ½-inch swivel socket
Flat-blade screwdriver
5/16 screwdriver-styled nut driver for the hose clamps
7/8-inch open-end wrench
Set of long massive Torx wrenches
JIMS exhaust gasket tool




JIMS has developed a new tool for ease of exhaust gasket seal installation on all Twin Cam or Evo heads. This new JIMS Exhaust Gasket Installer No. 788 will safely install exhaust gasket seal evenly and square without distorting the seal. Without the proper tool, you run the risk of developing an exhaust leak. This installer uses either the two exhaust stud flange nuts from the exhaust system or a JIMS No.33416-80 tool handle to install the seals.

JIMS Exhaust Gasket Seal Installer No. 788 is backed by a lifetime warranty and has an MSRP of $30.55. For more information visit JIMS on the web at www.jimsusa.com, find them on facebook, or call 805-482-6913.


Exhaust spring clip tool

The stock system on Victor's Fatboy.
The stock system on Victor's Fatboy.



Parts List:

2—3/8-inch 16X3/4-inch hex head bolts
2—3/8-inch flat washers
2—5/16-inch-18 x ½-inch bolts
2—5/16-inch flat washers
1—SP06-85 mounting plate
2—1/4-inch-20 Allen head bolts*
2—SPO4-29 removable baffles*
5-#24 hose clamps*

*Installed in pipe assembly


With Victor's Softail on the lift, his bars were just at the right height to pop Bandit in the skull twice, before he covered the lever and grip with a couple of clean socks. Never hit it again.
With Victor's Softail on the lift, his bars were just at the right height to pop Bandit in the skull twice, before he covered the lever and grip with a couple of clean socks. Never hit it again.



We started by removing the master cylinder pivot pin cotter key, then the Torx bolt holding the brake lever in place. We had to rock the lever out of harm's way so the three 3/8-inch Torx footboard mounting screws could be removed and the foot board set safely out of the way.









Then we took off all the existing heat shields, but it’s good to note the position of the hose clamp fastener heads. We also noted how the flat blade screwdriver attempted to dance out of the slots on a regular basis, so we returned to the toolbox for the appropriate nut driver. It provided a much smoother, more secure operation.



Here is the major reason behind full-coverage heat shields.
Here is the major reason behind full-coverage heat shields.



These are the stock heat shields, but you can see the position of the hose clamp fasteners.
These are the stock heat shields, but you can see the position of the hose clamp fasteners.



Then we removed the four 5/16-inch flange nuts holding the pipes to the heads. These nuts are critical, and best reached without heat shield interference. We then removed the two 9/16-inch locking nuts holding the exhaust system mounting bracket to the frame. We did not need to remove the muffler clamps or mufflers, since the whole system is attached to the bracket, and we wouldn’t need it in the future. But there was a glitch--the passenger foot peg.

Sorry about the focus. We basically removed this bracket and replaced it with the Samson mounting plate--easy.
Sorry about the focus. We basically removed this bracket and replaced it with the Samson mounting plate--easy.



We started to loosen these bad boys, but didn't need to.
We started to loosen these bad boys, but didn't need to.



The foot peg fastener was a critical element used for attaching the massive muffler bracket to the frame. Once we removed the clip ring and the peg axle stud, we discovered a long 3/8 Torx Allen-styled bolt, and of course I didn’t have a Torx socket deep enough, or a long enough Torx to reach it. I was stuck, dead in the water. I called fellow land speed racer Tobey and caught him just leaving the Chowder Barge. I needed two things, and have no trust in our current junk auto-parts stores.

The new wrenches on top. They saved the day.
The new wrenches on top. They saved the day.



This bracket ran to the transmission with one 9/16-inch nut on the bottom. We removed it, and when the system was out off the way we backed off the transmission Allen bolts, took the bracket off and replaced them--done deal.
This bracket ran to the transmission with one 9/16-inch nut on the bottom. We removed it, and when the system was out off the way we backed off the transmission Allen bolts, took the bracket off and replaced them--done deal.




Tobey jumped on his sport bike and hit a major truck parts house—no luck. Then he jammed to one of these goofy auto parts stores and scored a set of massive Allen-styled Torx wrenches at O’Reilly’s. I didn’t know they made ‘em that big. Plus, we needed a rare 7/8-inch combination wrench to remove the 02 sensors. Very carefully, since most of these fasteners experience lotsa heat, I used a chemical spray, like Yield, on many threads to ease the pain of removal. That shit is amazing.



Once the peg was removed, the entire system popped free of the bike and we pulled it out just far enough to remove the costly 02 sensors with the big-ass 7/8-inch open-end wrench. Tobey saved the day, and kept the project moving.



We needed to remove the spring clips and flanges from the old system for use on the new Samson Hellraisers. I thought JIMS and a couple of other companies made a special tool for this application. It saves busted knuckles and lots of scratched chrome. Also note the flange positioning on the stock pipes. They slip onto the new pipes exactly the same way.

(Note: the snap rings may be lodged in the grove in the flange. Carefully pry the snap ring from the flange before removal.)

This is the time to remove the metal mesh exhaust gaskets if you wish to replace them. JIMS makes a very handy tool for installing new mesh exhaust pipe gaskets in the heads properly (above).


Advertisement

Page 1 of 2
Prev
[1]
2
Next

Share this story:



Back to Tech




Reader Comments


I used this article as a How-To for my Samson Hellraisers install on a 2013 Softail Slim... Very detailed very helpful... Thanks guys for all the info...

Mike Q
Glassboro, NJ
Wednesday, April 3, 2013
Editor Response Thanks. I'm sure you make Kenny's day, that's Mr. Samson to me.
--Bandit

Your thoughts on this article

Your Name
Email
City
Country
v
State/Province
v
Comments
Anti-Spam Question:
Please enter the words you see in the box, in order and separated by a space. Doing so helps prevent automated programs from abusing this service.
Submit
Clear