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Mudflap Girl FXRs, Part 6 Wiring with Wire Plus

Completion Is Feeling Very Close

By Bandit, with Photos by Sin Wu
12/3/2011


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I hid the wiring under this panel built by the Spitfire crew.
I hid the wiring under this panel built by the Spitfire crew.

 

Wiring is always a treat, unless you use one of those systems in a box like Phil's speed shop systems. I ran one on my factory racer, and it was a breeze. I'll try to find a photo. It was designed to mount to the frame seat post. Inside it contained the circuit breaker, the starter relay, the ignition switch, the starter button, high low beam, and horn button. Then a ream of wire rumbled out of a hole. I guided them to the appropriate spots and hook them up. Nothing to it.

Art by Chris Kallas.
Art by Chris Kallas.




In this case, we worked with Wire Plus since they are the masters of wiring kits, Speedos and assorted equipment. They sent me a complete wiring harness with a starter relay, flasher system for turn signals, a 30-amp circuit breaker with mounting strap and rivets. They also included an installation and operator manual for model Wp192, Mid Frame Mount System, with Chopper style harness, with or without turns.




Their manual affords the reader a lighting circuit flow chart, an ignition flow chart, and an accessory flow chart. It demonstrates several ignition switch wiring circuits and handlebar circuits. It even comes with a Wp143 lighting control system for auto-canceling style harness. Actually, I checked the Wire Plus web site and they do make a seat post ignition switch wiring system unit, in a coffin shape, classic, and old school. They also make a cylindrical shaped engine mounted ignition switch housing, and ignition and toggle switches. They have systems that include compression releases--Amazing.




Wire Plus also makes individual wiring products, like their lighting control modules, power modules, plus custom power ports, for plugging in accessories. There's a reason for going on and on about Wire Plus. Wiring can be a nightmare, and I'm a lazy. I want to be as minimal as possible, for ease and reliability, but I'm fulla shit. Just about the time I think I need to cut turn signals out of my system, someone is wiring in heated grips, or a heated seat, a some sound system, or neon lights under the engine. I avoid anything extra, like the plague. Hell, wire plus make engine mounted electrical port systems, so you can plug in your heated vest, helmet sound system, or whatever.




This is going to be a terrific test. My son's bike will contain more bells and whistles, and Grip Ace controls in the bars. Tim from Grip Ace from Rivera is coming over to show us how easy it is. On Frank's bike, we will install turn signals, so anything is possible. We will also wire a metric bike, the XS Yamaha bobber. So, over the next couple of months you will witness three variations, with Wire Plus products.



Since the backbone was massive I drilled 1/2-inch holes, and used rubber grommets to protect the wires.
Since the backbone was massive I drilled 1/2-inch holes, and used rubber grommets to protect the wires.






I start wiring by finding all the components and placing them somewhat in position. Then I search for a place to hide the circuit breaker and a circuit board, or bank of connections. First, we made a trip to the local Marine store and ordered an ignition switch. This included a starter switch, but we were using the Spyke push-button starter mounted to the solenoid. It eliminated the starter relay and any starter switches.



Once I determined a handy location behind one of the Mudfap Girl FXR panels, I drew up a wiring schematic, while referring to the Wire Plus handy manual for guidance. I came up with this nuts notion of hiding the ignition switch under the seat nose, which would position it perfectly for some of the wiring, and run some of it through the backbone of the frame. I grappled with a mounting notion, but Danny came up with the final notion, which took a lot of work, but was highly secure.

This shows our marine switch and the piece we hand-fabricated to hold it in the end of the backbone of the Spitfire frame.
This shows our marine switch and the piece we hand-fabricated to hold it in the end of the backbone of the Spitfire frame.



We won't shrink tube any wires until we tear down for paint.
We won't shrink tube any wires until we tear down for paint.





Wire plus makes several digital speedos, and several mounting systems for different applications. It was a breeze to mount and wire once I found the mysterious neutral switch connectors, which I ordered from the factory. The WP speedo mounted like a dream on the bars, once I plugged the wiring harness into the rear of the unit, ran the wires under the tank, back to the nerve center for power, then to the speedo sensor, and the neutral switch. Nothing to that one, although I wouldn't mind running the wire loom through the frame in the future.














Since I was thinking about the rear brake pressure switch, I started to work out my GMA brake systems, and we made some measurements. I ran over to Baker Performance products and in five minutes we had new brake lines cut to size. This was probably the easiest bleeding process I have ever encountered. They were bled and working in no-time. Unfortunately, GMA doesn't make a clutch lever to match.

The Spitfire controls and master cylinder ready to rock.
The Spitfire controls and master cylinder ready to rock.




Front GMA caliper waiting on the brake line.
Front GMA caliper waiting on the brake line.





My frame ground.
My frame ground.



The ground on the Spyke starter. See the yellow connector. That's a 10 gauge wire leading to the frame ground. I replaced it with an official grounding strap.
The ground on the Spyke starter. See the yellow connector. That's a 10 gauge wire leading to the frame ground. I replaced it with an official grounding strap.




On rubber-mounted bikes, I run two grounds. I welded one to the frame and I use one of the Spyke starter mounting bolts as an auxiliary ground. I don't want to take any chances with the charging system, or the ignition system missing a grounding connection.






I needed to mount an On-On switch in the headlight bucket. It took some hunting for the correct sized switch, then a headlight seal beam from Biker's Choice, and a lot of digging for a three blade connector. My headlight came from a spot on a police car in the '30s.

Here's the partially wired ignition switch sticking out of the backbone of the frame.
Here's the partially wired ignition switch sticking out of the backbone of the frame.



The Spitfire crew made my panels out of old street signs. Now you can see the wiring system in place.
The Spitfire crew made my panels out of old street signs. Now you can see the wiring system in place.





This is it, no external ignition module. Super simple to time, and you're done forever.
This is it, no external ignition module. Super simple to time, and you're done forever.



Just the hot wire from the ignition switch so far.
Just the hot wire from the ignition switch so far.






Almost all of my electrical components came from Spyke or Compu-Fire. The Compu-fire ignition system is a breeze. This time I'm running a Compu-Fire single fire ignition system, with their single, dual wound coil, which mounts between the heads, in the standard stock position. It's all too tight and convenient. Two wires to the coil and one to power and the system is good to go. It's about that easy to time.



My son showed up with the missing parts for his Bub Bare exhaust system, and we started mounting it. I wish the exhaust guys would make kits with the flanges and retainer spring rings. Some systems come complete, but it's a drag to run to the dealership, when you're ready to rock. I understand why they don't supply them with many system. If the system is replacing a stock system, we just switch out the parts. And these four pieces would jack up the price, but give the customer the option, and the manufacturer could make an extra buck and save the builder time and hassle.

For some unknown reason we needed to find longer fasteners to attach the Bub bracket to the JIMS Transmission.
For some unknown reason we needed to find longer fasteners to attach the Bub bracket to the JIMS Transmission.



Frank's Bub system in place.
Frank's Bub system in place.



This system slices damn close to $350 and you paint it with whatever heat paint, or heat wrap you like. It's very similar to my D&D system.

My Mudflap Girl is running and waiting on a seat. We had to adjust the Progressive shocks before we shipped the bike to Saddlemen.
My Mudflap Girl is running and waiting on a seat. We had to adjust the Progressive shocks before we shipped the bike to Saddlemen.



One of the senior family Saddlemen team members. What a terrific crew. They carefully pondered my seat challenge.
One of the senior family Saddlemen team members. What a terrific crew. They carefully pondered my seat challenge.




Next, we will take you to Saddlemen to see my custom seat manufactured, the gel installed and the new sexy Saddlemen, long distance design. Plus we will bring you a Mr. Lucky's Weld-on Kick Stand installation. Oh, here's some images of all the Wire Plus speedo mounting systems.
 
 
 



Sources:

Spitfire


Biker's Choice


JIMS Machine
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MetalSport
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BDL/GMA


Wire Plus
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Branch O'Keefe
Click the image for more info.
Click the image for more info.



Bennett's Performance


Custom Cycle Engineering
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Saddlemen


Bub
Click on the image for more info.
Click on the image for more info.

 
Progress Suspension

Hope to ride it home from Saddlemens' shop.
Hope to ride it home from Saddlemens' shop.


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Reader Comments


Does the Mudflap bike run ? You indicate you want to ride it back from Saddleman Seats It looks mighty crazy for sure, like something you would have built in the early years. All you need is an expanded metal primary cover to go Bandit Retro.

You might have been entered in the OCC, PJD, Jesse competition as a dark horse. I think it would kick all their butts !


anson
south LA, LA
Tuesday, December 06, 2011
Editor Response Thanks,

Yes, the bike runs. I can't wait for my break-in cruise to 29 Palms, then to Sturgis with my son. I'm going to work on his bike later today.
--Bandit

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