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Franky’s ’05 Dyna Fix, Part 2

Brass Balls, Barnett, and Aeromach came through on this ambitious rebuild project

By Bandit with photos by Wrench
7/10/2017


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Okay, a lot has happened since the last episode. We installed the new CCE Dyna motor mounts. It was easy except for the placement of the jack. We needed to keep the jack clear so the old units would drop out easily. A chunk of 2 by 4 did the trick.



We had a discussion about Loctite. I use Loctite, stainless lock washers, and Nylock nuts whenever possible. I learned a lesson about red Loctite. That shit is mean and will cause serious problems, so the best bet for most applications is blue, except for engine and transmission mounting bolts, and as you will see transmission mainshaft splines.



When I wasn’t looking, Franky pulled the primary and started to take the clutch apart. This got tricky. The clutch hub nut is left-handed threads, whereas the engine compensator nut is right hand. Both of these bastards were tight, too tight. We fought the transmission nut for days with my impact driver.

This is another one I confirmed with Eric. We decided to remove the engine exhaust mount and ran into problems with the four 1/4-20 Torx bolts. I ended up welding several Allen wrenches to the heads to do the job.  Eric agreed, "They're bastards."
This is another one I confirmed with Eric. We decided to remove the engine exhaust mount and ran into problems with the four 1/4-20 Torx bolts. I ended up welding several Allen wrenches to the heads to do the job. Eric agreed, "They're bastards."



This is the unneeded exhaust bracket. Whatta pain... But the job is done.
This is the unneeded exhaust bracket. Whatta pain... But the job is done.



When I feel lost, I reach out to Eric Bennett at Bennett’s Performance. He deals with this shit daily and knows the variations. “Is your compressor strong enough?” he asked. It was a good question and I’ve dealt with this issue before.



We have a shop compressor set at 150 pounds. The shop next door made a compressor connection for us out the side of their building. It takes more line to make the connection. But it did the trick. “The other issue can be too much Loctite on the threads, and you might need heat,” Eric said.

Not so much on the transmission, but using an impact driver on the compensator nut can damage the alternator. You want to get the job done quickly and efficiently.
Not so much on the transmission, but using an impact driver on the compensator nut can damage the alternator. You want to get the job done quickly and efficiently.



The stronger compressor did the trick for the transmission, but not the engine. Even the manual suggested too much Loctite and the use of heat. In the case of the engine, heat was the solution. We pulled everything apart.


Just to stay on the safe side, here are the Barnett Scorpion removal steps:

JIMS makes the perfect tool for locking the primary drive for removal, but this chunk of Teflon worked like a champ.
JIMS makes the perfect tool for locking the primary drive for removal, but this chunk of Teflon worked like a champ.



Note: A hydraulic press is required to remove OEM clutch hub and install the Barnett Scorpion clutch hub! We have one in the Bikernet Shop.

Barnett Tool and engineering recommends changing primary lubricant after the first 500 miles and every 5,000 miles thereafter.



Remove primary drain plug at bottom of primary.

Remove foot pegs (shifter lever) floorboard etc.

Remove five screws to remove the derby inspection cover from the primary chain cover.

Remove 13 socket set screws with washers from the primary cover. Remove the primary cover.
 
Refer to your factory manual to remove the clutch basket and associated components using proper safety instructions, proper tools and pullers.



As it turned out, both major nuts were overloaded with Loctite and needed to have the threads wire-brushed clean, before installation.



Using a hydraulic press, remove the OEM clutch hub from the clutch basket. Watch for clip rings that might need removal.



Firmly support the OEM basket as shown during this operation. After pressing the hub out, check the bearing for smoothness. If the bearing feels rough or binds, it must be replaced.



Using the press is better accomplished with another set of eyes and hands to make sure everything is aligned. I have lots of chunks of bar stock of different diameters, and a wide selection of sockets help, too.



Barnett Warning: Always wear proper eye protection when removing or installing snap rings. Slippage may propel the ring with enough force to cause an eye injury. Verify the tips of the pliers are not excessively worn or damaged. That’s a tough one…





Barnett Installation Guidelines for a Scorpion Clutch



Install snap ring into rear of Barnett Scorpion hub; make sure the snap ring is correctly embedded into the snap ring groove. There are two grooves. The inner groove is for the 2011 and up models, and the outer groove is for all other models.

I hope we did the correctly...Sometimes is helps to tap the surface around the snap ring with a small hammer to seat the ring.
I hope we did the correctly...Sometimes is helps to tap the surface around the snap ring with a small hammer to seat the ring.



Reinstall the clutch basket into the primary case (don’t forget the chain, chain adjuster and the compensating sprocket). Using red Loctite on the transmission main shaft before installing the clutch hub nut. Tighten the hub nut to 50-60 ft-lbs.







Start by installing the “B” fiber plate (B plate has larger I.D.). Next, install the damper spring seat (flat steel band), and then install the damper spring (curved steel band) with the white dot facing out. Follow with a steel plate, then fiber, steel, fiber, ending with a steel plate installed last.









Install the pressure plate using six MT-95 springs, six spring cups, and six 6mm SHCS bolts.






The Barnett Scorpion comes with three varieties of spring pressure for your riding style and clutch handling. If you have a hot rod and ride hard, you may want stronger springs. If you need a lighter touch clutch, you may want to go with lighter springs.



Torque the 6mm Allens to 5 ft-lb.

Adjust clutch and cable per factory instructions.

Franky rode the mudflap girl FXR to Born Free. Ran like a top. Evos rule.
Franky rode the mudflap girl FXR to Born Free. Ran like a top. Evos rule.



Check and adjust the primary chain as needed. Re-install outer primary cover and pour proper amount and type of Spectro primary chaincase lubricant through the clutch inspection opening.
 
Spectro Primary Case Oil Description: This sheer stable petroleum is designed to withstand the punishment of high loads, and contains special polymers to provide exceptional clutch engagement and temperature stability. Meets full OEM requirements, and should be used according to manufacturer’s instructions. Formulated specifically for Harley Sportster and Big Twin applications. Low drag, low friction loss SAE 85w viscosity eliminates clutch “drag” and slipping.
85w R.GAPCL 12/1 qt bottles/case
85w X.GAPCL 16 gal drum
 



Don’t forget the starter components if you removed the starter.



We also introduced a new 5-Ball Racing product by Two-Bit Choppers. Justing did a helluva job and they should be for sale in our shop.
We also introduced a new 5-Ball Racing product by Two-Bit Choppers. Justing did a helluva job and they should be for sale in our shop.



Using new gaskets from California Harley, we replaced the primary gasket, the inspection cover gasket and the derby gasket.
 





Finally, we straightened his stock shifter lever, buffed the road rash and installed it. A new Brass Balls Cycles shift lever is headed our way, but we did install the wild billet pegs.



The later model swingarm became a major issue. I couldn’t find anyone who had switched out an early model swingarm for a late heavier, stronger model.



I took on the final assembly by myself. I had to bore out the transmission case from 5/8-inch to ¾ inch for the new axle. Fortunately, the case width is exactly the same. I pressed in all the sleeves and bearings using my handmade press with all-thread. Once the parts were in place and the case bored, the swingarm fit like a dream, except…



I couldn’t get the axle nut on the left to start. I was concerned that some machining would be required, but I was patient. When Franky showed up, I backed off the axle and had him hold the nut in place on the other side. He did, and it slipped together like a dream and we applied the proper torque.

We also installed the latest Harley-Davidson adjustable 13-inch shocks.
We also installed the latest Harley-Davidson adjustable 13-inch shocks.



We are waiting on our MetalSport wheels, tires, rotors and pulley, and then we need to bore the old brake anchor for the new 1-inch axle.




While I worked on my Panhead, Franky installed the Brass Balls grips and Aeromach levers. His clutch perch was damaged from the accident and he had to chase one down. The Brass Balls grip confused him since it doesn’t slip under the switch housing like a stock grip would.


He cleaned up the ends of the bars, also damaged from the accident. Then he slid on the Brass Balls grips. I suggested some silicone on the bar to dampen vibration and secure the grip. Brass Balls supplies stainless setscrews to hold the billet grip in place.



He replaced the perch and we installed the Aeromach lever. It came with the old style axle and not the Teflon bar, but we greased it and oiled the cable, so finally we could adjust the clutch and install the derby. I’m sure I have a Teflon bar to replace the steel unit.



On the throttle side, he grappled with the puzzle of positioning the brake master cylinder, the lever perch, the switch housing, the throttle and the throttle cables. We carefully oiled the throttle cables from the top, greased the Brass Balls throttle cable grooves and made sure there were no kinks in the cables.

Next, we need to replace the wiring and install the Zipper’s Thundermax EFI system. Then with the MetalSport Wheels and new paint, we can replace the front end and finish the build. Hang on!






SOURCES

Aeromach
www.aeromachmfg.com/Motorcycle

Barnett Clutch and Cables
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Custom Cycle Engineering
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ENGINEERED APPLICATIONS
Vernon, California
(323) 5852894 

Bennett’s Performance

Love Jugs
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Lindby Bars 
Click for action.
Click for action.


  

Biker’s Choice
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Twin Power
Click for action.
Click for action.



MetalSport Wheels
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BDI Exhaust
Call (530) 274-0800
Email Ramsay@bub-design.com
110 Springhill Drive, Suite 14 Grass Valley, California 95945

Zipper’s Performance
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We eliminated the zippers from some 5-Ball Leather side pocket, so you can use them and be comfortable. There are plenty of pocket with zippers in our Special Ops Jackets and Vests. Click for action.
We eliminated the zippers from some 5-Ball Leather side pocket, so you can use them and be comfortable. There are plenty of pocket with zippers in our Special Ops Jackets and Vests. Click for action.


Larry Settles
Address: 1436 259th St, Harbor City, CA 90710
Phone:(310) 326-3466

Yvonne Mecalis
https://www.yvonnedesigns.com/

Chris Morrison Paint

Ronnie’s Harley-Davidson

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